fun

Campaign for Clear Code starts here!





I’m concerned about the software that’s installed on my electronic devices.

You should be worried as well.

Have you really considered what you are opening yourself up to every time you download a new app or install an upgrade?

Have you thought about what all those faceless software giants are doing with the code that they are busy sneaking onto your phone?

Do you have any idea what they are slipping directly into your pocket? It certainly isn’t good for you. After all its not you they care about. All that really concerns them is profit, pure and simple. They want you coming back for more, why else would they make those damn games so additive?

Screen Shot 2015-05-08 at 21.26.12

And has that code even been tested properly? They claim it has, but why then does big software continually release patches and updates?

Just stop for a minute and ask yourself this. Do you really know what you are putting on your computer when you downloaded Candy Crush? Have you ever seen the code?

Take a look at this.

“;
for(i=0;i<=20;i++)
{
f=random(3);
z=random(3);
if(tic[f][z]==’ ‘)
co-ordinates
{
tic[f][z]=’O’;
goto x;
}
else
continue;
}
x:newdisp();
d=check();
if(d==0)
user();
else
{
cout<<“

Understand it?

No, me neither.

Want to know where that snippet of code came from? Its just a small part of a computer program for tic-tac-toe. And if a game as simple as that has stuff like that in it then imagine what’s in Candy Crush, Angry Birds or even Powerpoint?

And it gets worse. Because some computer programer, in the pay of cooperate giants, writes this sort of thing before processing it into something that might not even contain recognisable words! The software companies call this ‘compiling’ and afterwards its bears no resemblance what-so-ever to the natural code.

I, for one, won’t stand for this sort of thing being foisted on me by big-software any longer.

Now is the time to take a stand.

I call for a campaign for clear code.

Basically, if a 10 year old child can’t code it then it has no place on my devices.

From this point onwards I’m reverting back to simple code that anyone can understand. I’m using nothing more than Scratch running on a nice wholesome Pi. I urge you to do the same.

And don’t even get me started on anti-virus software. Much better to share infected USB sticks around.

By May 8, 2015 3 comments fun, opinion, Uncategorized

What has Chemistry got to say?

The XKCD comics have been keeping me entertained and informed for years.

But sadly, in the latest comic, Chemistry seems rather quiet.

So how about some suggestions for the next panel, where Chemistry finds a voice?





 

By May 5, 2015 2 comments fun, Uncategorized

23 Million Times Slower than Molasses

I have the pleasure of teaching general chemistry II for the first time ever this semester. It is fun to go back and revisit concepts that I have not spent time with since taking general chemistry ~13 years ago. Our first few classes will focus on intermolecular forces (dipole-dipole, London Dispersion, etc.) and some of their macroscopic manifestations. Some examples covered in the book include surface tension, capillary action and viscosity. Searching these topics online led me to my new favorite experiment: the Pitch Drop Experiment.
Pitch Drop

In 1927, Professor Thomas Parnell started the Pitch Drop experiment in which he sought to measure the viscosity of pitch. Pitch is a general term used to describe a highly viscous solid polymer, but this material is often a complex mixture of phenols, aromatic and long chain hydrocarbons. Unfortunately, I could not find the exact composition of the pitch used in this specific experiment, but needless to say this sample does meet the description of a highly viscous material.

The experiment was initiated when Prof. Parnell heated up a sample of pitch and poured it into a conical piece of glass. The pitch was then left to sit for three years, presumably the length of time it needed to cool and completely settle into the cone shape. Immediately after the bottom of the funnel was cut open the pitch came rushing out. Just kidding. The pitch ever so slowly began dripping out of the funnel. How slowly? At a rate of approximately one drop every 10 years. In fact, the most recent drop—the 9th drop ever– fell on April 17th 2014.

The first report on this experiment was published in the European Journal of Physics in 1984. In that manuscript they calculated the pitch (2.3 x 108 Pa s) to be 230 billion times more viscous than water (1.0 x 10-3 Pa s). That means it’s more than 23 million times slower than molasses (5-10 Pa s). The longevity and creativity of this experiment won Thomas Parnell and John Mainstone (the caretaker of the experiment for more than 50 years) an Ig Nobel Prize in 2005. The experiment has also been officially included in the Guinness World Records as the world’s longest continuously running laboratory experiment.

Despite this experiment’s epicness, or maybe because of it, no one has ever been in the room to watch one of the pitch drops fall. The closest anyone has come is a time-lapse video below.


The video is unfortunately anticlimactic. It shows the 9th drop making contact with the 8th drop in the beaker. It isn’t the spectacle of a full ‘drop’ event, but don’t worry. The next occurrence is right around the corner: about 14 years away. In anticipation of this event the University of Queensland has set up three webcams and a continuously streaming live feed on a website called The Tenth Watch. Regardless of where you find yourself, you can keep a constant eye on the experiment as it progresses. And even if you miss the 10th drop, don’t worry, it’s estimated that there is enough pitch in the funnel to produce several more drops over the next 100 years.

By January 24, 2015 3 comments fun, general chemistry

New manufacturer of NMR instruments to enter the market

With the exit of Agilent from the NMR instrument market there’s a gap that is in desperate need of filling. Now it looks like a rather unusual group is considering plugging the hole. The company, usual associated with construction but also happens to be the largest manufacture of tyres in the world, is conducting a poll to see whether NMR is a viable option for them.

If you think the chemistry community needs a new NMR instrument manufacturer then please pop over to their website and let your thoughts be known.

 

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Update:

The lego NMR instrument now comes with mini figures!

 

 

By January 19, 2015 0 comments fun, general chemistry