physical chemistry

ACS LiveSlides: Another Step in Multimedia Science Publishing

Last March I introduced the Hanson research group’s five minute GEOSET videos. I’ve since learned that, in July 2013, Prashant V. Kamat (Deputy Editor), George C. Schatz (Editor-in-Chief) and their co-workers at the Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters announced ACS LiveSlides™, a user friendly mechanism for generating and sharing video slideshows for each manuscript. As noted in their editorial piece, they were motivated by the “changing publication landscape and the wide availability of new electronic tools have made it increasingly important to explore new ways to disseminate published research.”

We recently created an ACS LiveSlides™ presentation for our J. Phys. Chem. Lett. manuscript, “Photon Upconversion and Photocurrent Generation via Self-Assembly at Organic–Inorganic Interfaces.” The paper introduces self-assembled bilayers as a means of facilitating molecular photon upconversion and demonstrates photocurrent generation from the upconverted state. It’s arguably the first example of directly extracting charge from a molecular upconverted state if using the first submission date, first public disclosure, or the patent application date as markers. If using the manuscript acceptance date, Simpson et. al’s publication holds that distinction.

An invitation to create an ACS LiveSlides™ presentation immediately followed the message notifying us that our manuscript was accepted. All we needed to do was provide 5-8 Power Point Slides summarizing the manuscript (using a format provided by the ACS) and record an accompanying <10-minute mp3 audio file. The editors took the files (and a list of times for each slide transitions) and published our LiveSlides™ presentation in less than a week. It was an easy process and now anyone can view our presentation. No subscription necessary.

One drawback is that the video cannot be embedded on a webpage. As stated in their terms:

Files available from the ACS website may be downloaded for personal use only. Users are not otherwise permitted to reproduce, republish, redistribute, or sell any Supporting Information from the ACS website…

So we have a backup plan for those preferring an embedded video. Below you’ll find our GEOSET video summary presented by Sean Hill.

Sharing Science: Distilling Publications Into 5 Minute Videos

Aiming to make our research more accessible, the Hanson research group will post five minute videos recapping each of our papers after they are published. This probably sounds like a very time consuming undertaking, but our group is very lucky to have access to GEOSET studio, a creation of our local Nobelist Harry Kroto.

Harry, a 2006 Nobel Prize winner for the discovery of the Buckminster Fullerene and current faculty member at Florida State University, has been heavily involved in outreach activities encouraging children and public involvement in science. Global Educational Outreach for Science, Engineering and Technology (GEOSET) is one branch of this effort. GEOSET is a free, online service that allows users to upload and view science-related videos. GEOSET videos mirror what students see in a seminar or classroom. Its dual-window format shows side-by-side views of the presenter and his or her presentation slides (or you can click to expand one or the other).

The process for creating a video is very user-friendly. All I need to bring to the GEOSET studio are myself and my presentation slides (quick aside: I don’t mean to underplay what may be a stressful activity for those who are camera-shy. It takes a lot to be a comfortable presenter. Thankfully, GEOSET makes it as easy as possible). The studio camera has a teleprompter that shows your presentation slides as you present. It’s a wonderful set-up that makes it look like you are presenting off the top of your head. After giving your presentation, just like you would at any group meeting, the in-studio software couples the recording with the presentation file and then the GEOSET staff post the video online.

There are numerous partner institutions around the world that have dedicated studios for creating GEOSET videos. At FSU the GEOSET studio is located on campus in the Dirac Library. Any student/faculty/staff can schedule an appointment, bring their presentation file (Keynote, PowerPoint, etc.) and quickly record a video.

The first GEOSET video from our research group is presented by second year graduate student Jamie Wang. Jamie recently published her paper “Modulating Electron Transfer Dynamics at Dye–Semiconductor Interfaces via Self-Assembled Bilayers”, in the Journal of Physical Chemistry C. Her research is focused on controlling electron transfer events at dye-semiconductor interfaces particularly for application in dye-sensitized solar cells.

I want to send a special thanks to Jamie for being the first group member to pioneer this Hanson Research group practice. She did a wonderful job and will serve as a solid example for future videos – a few of which will be available soon.

LeBron James Promotes Sheet-y Science

It’s been quite a year for the NBA All-Star: claiming his first NBA Championship, winning gold in the 2012 London Olympics, and now…promoting dietary supplements?

The product in question, Sheets®, offers variations on the “breath strips” made popular roughly a decade ago. Each strip contains different GRAS additives, such as melatonin to aid sleep, or caffeine in the Energy Sheets®. Despite the fecundity of the exclamation points in the FAQs, or even the curious swath of ‘beautiful people’ who promote this product, I’d be willing to give it a pass, if it weren’t for one teeny, tiny detail: the “Science page.”

Here’s the full scientific statement:

“It’s simple…Sheets® solve problems! Sheets® are paper-thin, individually wrapped pocket-sized strips. No cans. No bottles. Simply place on tongue and your problem dissolves. How? Sheets® are packed with nutrients/vitamins and other active ingredients that, when placed on tongue, will begin to dissolve allowing for easy digestion.

Hang on a second….AAAAAUGH!

OK, all better now. Let’s see if we can break that down further for our discerning audience. Apparently, the science of Sheets® involves dissolution (“place on tongue”) followed by digestion of nutrients/vitamins. Did everyone get/understand that, or should I repeat/rehash it again? Never mind those goofy pictures with the colorful stamped film, which looks uncomfortably like another orally administered molecule

Source: sheetsbrand.com

#EpicScienceFAIL

Let’s go to our good friend Google patents to find some real science on this sheet-y product. I dug up two documents in short order: US patent 4,713,243 (Johnson & Johnson, 1987) and US 6,419,903 B1 (Colgate, 2002). Both patents describe various technologies for impregnating thin, extruded films of soluble polymer with medicaments for oral administration. Translation – edible drug strips.

The base polymer of choice, even 25 years ago, seemed to be hydroxyalkyl cellulose, one form of which we call pullulan. Various swell-able filler polymers, such as gelatin, corn starch, or PEG (polyethylene glycol) mix with the pullulan to regulate its toughness and stiffness, as well as to serve as a carrier for the active ingredients. For the Colgate breath strips, these include zinc compounds or alpha-ionone, which help to fight volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs) in your mouth. The J&J patent reaches even further, engineering strips to fight bacteria (sulfadiazine), pain (potassium nitrate), or to reduce swelling (hydrocortisone).

Honestly? I was most surprised by the level of formulation science that goes into each strip: viscosity tests, dispersion, dissolution, adherence, blending, and extrusion. Sounds like the perfect job for a p-chemist.

Just don’t get LeBron involved. Please.

Ice is not just ice

I'd go for the one on the left.

Dozois' "ice rock" on the left, typical ice on the right (Photo credit: Katie Robbins, for The Atlantic)

Gourmet ice? Yeah, it’s not really my thing either (I’m not much of a drinker, and when I do, it’s mostly microbrew.) But I found the story of entrepreneur Michel Dozois on the The Atlantic’s website to be pretty interesting and something that I find just tiny little bit terrifying as a chemist:

Although he was using recipes he’d made many times before, in this new setting, suddenly none were quite right. “My cocktails sucked. I’m pissed,” he recalls. “The ingredients were almost the same. The recipes, I know, I had them. They were great. That’s the moment where you’re like dude, what am I doing wrong? And you’re flipping out.”

It wasn’t until he took a sip from one of the rejected cocktail glasses, by then just a pool of melted ice, that he realized the source of the foul taste. “l looked down at that and I realized, it’s f–king sh–ty ice. That’s what that is. The ice is f–king up all of my cocktails. Every one of them.”

Now there’s something I haven’t been thinking about as a chemist, which is the contents of the ice that I’m throwing into reactions for cooling, dilution or precipitation. Dozois has begun selling gourmet ice to high-end bars in L.A. with different shapes. Some of Dozois’ ice (like the pictured “ice rock” above, left) allows for cooler drinks without as much dilution. His preparation is quite involved:

Dozois says the key lies in three principles—filtration, aging, and shape. The water is filtered twice, using reverse osmosis, through which he says the company loses about eight ounces of water for every one ounce preserved. Once purified, the water is then frozen, where it is aged for at least 48 hours, increasing its density and making it colder and stronger. Though other ice connoisseurs don’t age their frozen cubes, Dozois considers this step so integral to his product that he took the name Névé, the word for compacted snow that ultimately becomes glacial ice.

The ice is then cut into one of four different products. “Every cocktail calls for different dilution, different ice, different needs,” Dozois explains. In addition to the Old Fashioned cubes, Névé also makes sells a longer, narrower Tom Collins cube made for high ball glasses, and a sexy orb-shaped version, modeled after Japanese ice spheres. Of all the products, Dozois has a special fondness for the “shaking ice,” a small cornerless cube, which because of ageing and its unique design can withstand a vigorous joggle in a cocktail shaker without breaking.

While this doesn’t deal with reaction chemistry directly, I am reminded of the different uses of ice for precipitating compounds from solution. Certainly, you wouldn’t want one big block of ice (less surface area); you’d probably want a smaller, more pellet-like ice for the best precipitating results (and possibly, the best cooling of reactions.) Interesting how the same principles guide mixologists and chemists to different choices.

By February 13, 2011 7 comments fun, physical chemistry, Uncategorized