No more Chmoogle!

The forces that be (ie Google) have set their sights on Chmoogle and decided to take Chmoogle to court for trademark infringement. Instead of fighting, Chmoogle has relinquished that name and reverted to eMolecules. C&EN has a nice article here:
http://pubs.acs.org/isubscribe/journals/cen/84/i23/html/8423newscripts.html#2

You can read EMolecules views here:
http://www.emolecules.com/doc/google_vs_chmoogle/index.htm

By June 10, 2006 0 comments Uncategorized

Anonymous Chemistry Bloggers

Here is the inside scoop on the strange and weird world of anonymous chemistry blogging. So, I first noticed anonymous chemistry blogging from http://totallysynthetic.com/blog. The given reason for anonymity, “Well, I’m not giving away my identity for fear of reprisals.” Although, from what I’ve seen of his blog it looks reasonably “clean”. At any rate I’ve figured out who he really is and will share his identity with my small limited audience. His name is **u* *****r**, that’s my hint and you’ll just have to figure out the rest yourself if you are so inclined. Wink

An other anonymous chemistry blogger can be found at Molecule of the Day, http://www.moleculeoftheday.com/. This one did a much better job of protecting their identity. But, he or she did mention to me that they may attend the ACS conference this fall in SF. If they do attend, you can count on me to try to get a photo to share with all of you.

By June 2, 2006 0 comments Uncategorized

Allotropes, Polymorphs, and Isomerism oh my

The term allotrope is one of the most vaguely defined chemical terms still in current use. I can understand how one could call the various forms of sulfur (ie. rhombic and monoclinic) as distinct allotropes. But 2 chemical species that can’t be transformed into each other by physical means just don’t seem to garner the right to be called an allotrope. This issue was recently brought up by Fritnat, http://www.chemicalforums.com/index.php?topic=8500.0, when he advocated ozone should be called oxygen since it is an “allotrope” of diatomic oxygen.

At any rate you can read more about the wonderful world of allotropism in a recent article by William B. Jensen, http://jchemed.chem.wisc.edu/Journal/Issues/2006/Jun/abs838.html. It’s a very short read and packed with a historical perspective on the use of the word allotrope. Eventhough, Mr. Jensen never replied to a comment I sent him, I would still recommend everyone read this article. Wink

Mitch

By June 1, 2006 0 comments Uncategorized

Wired Magazine and the fall of citizen chemistry

I’m not a usually a reader of Wired magazine but recently they’ve done an expose on the troubles with citizen chemistry in America. They use the less regal phrase do-it-yourself DIY chemistry and the article can be found here http://wired.com/wired/archive/14.06/chemistry.html .

Trying to do my small part for the citizen science community I created a new forum for individuals to trade chemicals and supplies with each other http://www.chemicalforums.com/index.php?board=53.0, its a sad day when it has to come down to actions like this. But in a hyper-vigilante government era these are the kinds of steps the average citizen has to take.

Mitch

P.S. I know that forum will not be used much, but I’m just doing my small part.

By May 31, 2006 0 comments Uncategorized