Post Tagged with: "chemmoviecarnival"

#ChemMovieCarnival: How to Kill a Werewolf in a Chemistry Lab

Here’s a late entry of the chemistry movie carnival. I hope there are a few people left in the theatre.

I’ve been running a ‘Science on the Screen’ course with a local college. Over the last few weeks we’ve been dissecting the science on the big and small screens. The home work was tough, but after a reasonable amount of popcorn and cough potatoing  we’ve pulled apart Dexters blood spatter (it doesn’t seem to take gravity into account), Breaking Bad (it was fun upsetting Reddit), Spiderman (Peter Parker is going to need a very high protein diet to make all that web), James May’s Things you need to know about chemistry (remember that?) and Star Wars (how come lasers make a sound in space and why do storm troopers fly backwards when hit by a laser?).

After all that we thought it was time to see if we could do better and maybe “fix a film” (an idea blatantly nicked from Nonfisci (thanks guys)).

The students decided that Underworld  needed some attention. I’ve not seen it, but apparently its an action horror with vampires, werewolves and the like. The werewolves are regularly killed using bullets laced with silver nitrate. Upon impact the bullets release their contents and the silver (at this point the Ag+ has somehow been miraculously reduced) proves fatal to the riddled lycanthrope.

So how to fix the film? Simple really, you just need to perform Tollen’s reaction before the werewolf gets you.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tXhT0kZnt6s&t=0m30s

 

 

By May 1, 2013 3 comments fun

#ChemMovieCarnival: Criminal Minds

Criminal Minds is one of my favorite television shows. It follows a team of FBI agents in the Behavioral Analysis Unit. They examine the psychology of crime scenes and the choices of the criminal before, during, and after a crime to build a behavioral profile which ultimately leads to the arrest of the criminal.

The show doesn’t lend itself to chemistry in every episode, but sometimes the show features some interesting opportunities for chemistry. I’ll highlight two here: one light and one sinister.

The resident nerdy genius, Dr. Spencer Reid, (someone to whom I have been compared an uncomfortable number of times…) displays some chemistry magic in a throwaway scene in a season two episode: “Profiler, Profiled.” He wows his coworkers with a ‘magic’ film canister (kids ask your parents what a film canister is) which explodes and shoots like a rocket across the office. Sadly, he calls this merely physics magic, but we’ll let it slide. While the magician doesn’t reveal his secret, it is almost certainly an Alka-Seltzer tablet in water. The bicarbonate and citric acid generate carbon dioxide, which builds up the pressure and causes the canister to fail. Very easy to try at home, where you could also use baking soda and vinegar.

The second example is much more nefarious. In a season six episode, “Sense Memory,” a criminal has an obsession with scents – bad news for a cab driver inundated with aromas every day. We see him flash back to his childhood and, probably, the scent of his mother. This turns criminal when several of his passengers go missing and end up dead. The team’s first clue is the large amount of methanol found in the victims’ lungs. Reid uses his nerdy genius again to educate the team on the properties of methanol.

I’m ok with most of what is presented here… it’s not too bad. Except when he claims methanol can be turned into plywood. Plywood is not made from methanol. In attempting to figure out just what they were talking about, I found that Criminal Minds’ script likely quotes almost directly from methanol’s Wikipedia page. The only latitude I’ll give them is that methanol is turned into formaldehyde which is converted to urea-formaldehyde, the resin used to hold sheets of wood veneer together to make plywood (all also found on Wikipedia).

But enough about that – that’s not even the most interesting chemistry in the episode. It’s the reason why the criminal needs methanol that’s interesting. It’s not just to murder his victims – while that would be unique, it would be perhaps a bit unnecessary. No, instead he needs the methanol in connection with his obsession with scents, particularly the scent from his childhood. His obsession leads him to attempt to preserve that scent, particularly when his job exposes him to so many unpredictable, and often offensive, odors.

He waits until he accepts a passenger with that critical aroma, then abducts them and drowns them in methanol. Essentially, he’s trying to capture eau de humaine. He soaks his victims in methanol to extract their essential oils. Then he distills the resulting solution to concentrate the oils, which he adds to homemade candles to preserve the scent. Some of the setup is questionable (why does the condenser not have water running through it?), but the concept is still interesting and correct enough for me.

Extraction, distillation, essential oils … very gross and disturbing, but creative fictional use of chemistry nonetheless. It goes without saying that you should not soak your friends in methanol for any reason (or your enemies). Instead, stick with chemistry and physics magic with Alka-Seltzer. Your friends will like you much better this way.

By April 21, 2013 2 comments chemical safety, entertainment, fun

#ChemMovieCarnival: Testing Breaking Bad

I can’t believe  no one else has grabbed Breaking Bad for the Chemmoviecarnival.

In case you don’t know its a show about a high school chemistry teacher, called Walter White, who turns his talents to the production of  methamphetamine in an attempt to subliment his measly teacher’s income. In the course of the show Walt deploys his encyclopaedic chemistry knowledge to get him and his dopey (in more ways than one) sidekick out of a few sticky scrapes. They make a battery to jump start a RV, dissolve bodies with HF, prepare ricin to dispose of his enemies and so on.

There’s plenty of neat, and reasonably  accurate, chemistry in the show. But do Walt’s various solutions (pun intended) really hold up to scrutiny? I thought I’d have a go at putting some of them to the test . Fear not, I haven’t started a meth lab in my garage. Instead I tested the scene where our (anti) heros use thermite to melt through a lock.

Here’s my set up. A nice tube of thermite sitting on top of a locked padlock.

 

Fire in the hole!

And its not looking good for the padlock. All that molten iron can’t have done it much good.

But after everything has cooled down….

One intact padlock! It won’t open, because I think the locking mechanism  has melted, but it would certainly keep a door locked.

So I guess that’s a chemistry fail for Walt and Breaking Bad. 

p.s. I think you folks over at Reddit might have taken me a whole lot more seriously than was my intent.

 

By April 21, 2013 5 comments entertainment, fun, general chemistry