Post Tagged with: "GEOSET"

ACS LiveSlides: Another Step in Multimedia Science Publishing

Last March I introduced the Hanson research group’s five minute GEOSET videos. I’ve since learned that, in July 2013, Prashant V. Kamat (Deputy Editor), George C. Schatz (Editor-in-Chief) and their co-workers at the Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters announced ACS LiveSlides™, a user friendly mechanism for generating and sharing video slideshows for each manuscript. As noted in their editorial piece, they were motivated by the “changing publication landscape and the wide availability of new electronic tools have made it increasingly important to explore new ways to disseminate published research.”

We recently created an ACS LiveSlides™ presentation for our J. Phys. Chem. Lett. manuscript, “Photon Upconversion and Photocurrent Generation via Self-Assembly at Organic–Inorganic Interfaces.” The paper introduces self-assembled bilayers as a means of facilitating molecular photon upconversion and demonstrates photocurrent generation from the upconverted state. It’s arguably the first example of directly extracting charge from a molecular upconverted state if using the first submission date, first public disclosure, or the patent application date as markers. If using the manuscript acceptance date, Simpson et. al’s publication holds that distinction.

An invitation to create an ACS LiveSlides™ presentation immediately followed the message notifying us that our manuscript was accepted. All we needed to do was provide 5-8 Power Point Slides summarizing the manuscript (using a format provided by the ACS) and record an accompanying <10-minute mp3 audio file. The editors took the files (and a list of times for each slide transitions) and published our LiveSlides™ presentation in less than a week. It was an easy process and now anyone can view our presentation. No subscription necessary.

One drawback is that the video cannot be embedded on a webpage. As stated in their terms:

Files available from the ACS website may be downloaded for personal use only. Users are not otherwise permitted to reproduce, republish, redistribute, or sell any Supporting Information from the ACS website…

So we have a backup plan for those preferring an embedded video. Below you’ll find our GEOSET video summary presented by Sean Hill.

Sharing Science: Distilling Publications Into 5 Minute Videos

Aiming to make our research more accessible, the Hanson research group will post five minute videos recapping each of our papers after they are published. This probably sounds like a very time consuming undertaking, but our group is very lucky to have access to GEOSET studio, a creation of our local Nobelist Harry Kroto.

Harry, a 2006 Nobel Prize winner for the discovery of the Buckminster Fullerene and current faculty member at Florida State University, has been heavily involved in outreach activities encouraging children and public involvement in science. Global Educational Outreach for Science, Engineering and Technology (GEOSET) is one branch of this effort. GEOSET is a free, online service that allows users to upload and view science-related videos. GEOSET videos mirror what students see in a seminar or classroom. Its dual-window format shows side-by-side views of the presenter and his or her presentation slides (or you can click to expand one or the other).

The process for creating a video is very user-friendly. All I need to bring to the GEOSET studio are myself and my presentation slides (quick aside: I don’t mean to underplay what may be a stressful activity for those who are camera-shy. It takes a lot to be a comfortable presenter. Thankfully, GEOSET makes it as easy as possible). The studio camera has a teleprompter that shows your presentation slides as you present. It’s a wonderful set-up that makes it look like you are presenting off the top of your head. After giving your presentation, just like you would at any group meeting, the in-studio software couples the recording with the presentation file and then the GEOSET staff post the video online.

There are numerous partner institutions around the world that have dedicated studios for creating GEOSET videos. At FSU the GEOSET studio is located on campus in the Dirac Library. Any student/faculty/staff can schedule an appointment, bring their presentation file (Keynote, PowerPoint, etc.) and quickly record a video.

The first GEOSET video from our research group is presented by second year graduate student Jamie Wang. Jamie recently published her paper “Modulating Electron Transfer Dynamics at Dye–Semiconductor Interfaces via Self-Assembled Bilayers”, in the Journal of Physical Chemistry C. Her research is focused on controlling electron transfer events at dye-semiconductor interfaces particularly for application in dye-sensitized solar cells.

I want to send a special thanks to Jamie for being the first group member to pioneer this Hanson Research group practice. She did a wonderful job and will serve as a solid example for future videos – a few of which will be available soon.