Chemistry Blog

Tag Archive: Nature

May 04

The Source Code Debate


miracle

Few researchers were using computers 30 years ago.  This quickly changed with the release of several commercially viable personal computers in the 1980s. Since then, processing power has increased and the cost of computers decreased at an exponential rate (see Moore’s Law). It’s no surprise that computers are now pivotal in chemistry research. We use …

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May 25

Nature Has a Graphical Abstracts Problem


Or I should say, it had a problem. The most annoying thing about Nature journals, not including Nature Chemistry, is they do not have a graphical abstract associated with their rss feed or even in their Table of Contents. However, I made a hack to view Nature with an associated graphical abstract over at ChemFeeds. …

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May 10

How Can Science Embrace Web 2.0: A Response to Rudy Baum


(This post is in response to the May 10 editorial in C&E News.  For the response to the April 19 editorial, click here) First, I want to thank Rudy Baum, editor-in-chief of C&E News, for taking the time to respond to my commentary.  I know he probably has other issues he’d rather talk about on …

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Apr 20

Is Chemistry Incompatible with Web 2.0?


(This post is in response to the April 19 editorial in C&E News.  For the response to the May 10 editorial, click here) A recent ChemJobber post notes that C&E News Editor-in-Chief Rudy Baum‘s editorials sometimes have a tendency to approach the controversial – and sometimes the purely political.  I wanted to discuss this weeks …

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Jan 16

NanoPropulsion


Sen-Mallouk-Crespi

Stephen J. Ebbens Jonathan Howse The current state of the art in nanopropulsion devices was recently reviewed by Ebbens and Howse in an article last Friday.[SoftMatter] A short summary of the nano- systems is presented below with video action shots when I could find them. The Whitesides Catalyst: Pt Fuel: H2O2 Propulsion: Bubble propulsion Terrain: …

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Oct 23

Long-term Experiments


I recently read this Nature article, where is described what is probably one of the longest experiments ever to be conducted. A population of E. coli was kept for 20 years (!) in a nutrient solution (low on glucose), and samples were taken and deep-frozen after 2000, 5000, 10000, 15000, 20000 and 40000 generations. The …

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